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TH Darmstadt, Germany, Dipl. He has submitted several important technical papers to the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society and other related publications, which have become foundational to modern loudspeaker theory[2].

Examples of his recent work include extensive development of dipolar loudspeaker theory[3]. He left no diary, nor chatty relatives to memorialize him in print. And if a cadre of associates had not recently agreed to open its files, Captain Alfred M. Hubbard might exist in death as he did in life--a man of mirrors and shadows, revealing himself to even his closest friends only on a need-to-know basis.

Beverly Hills psychiatrist Oscar Janiger once said of Hubbard, "We waited for him like a little old lady for the Sears-Roebuck catalog. Those who will talk about Al Hubbard are few. Oscar Janiger told this writer that "nothing of substance has been written about Al Hubbard, and probably nothing ever should.

But nobody is ambivalent about the Captain: He was as brilliant as the noonday sun, mysterious as the rarest virus, and friendly like a golden retriever.

The first visage of Hubbard was beheld by Dr. John Smythies were researching the correlation between schizophrenia and the hallucinogens mescaline and adrenochrome at Weyburn Hospital in Saskatchewan, Canada, when an A. Osmond later recalled, "It was a very dignified place, and I was rather awed by it. He was also very genial, an excellent host. Osmond supplied him with some. His identity as "captain" came from his master of sea vessels certification and a stint in the US Merchant Marine.

At the time of their meeting in , Al Hubbard owned secluded Daymen Island off the coast of Vancouver--a former Indian colony surrounded by a huge wall of oyster shells. To access his acre estate, Hubbard built a hangar for his aircraft and a slip for his yacht from a fallen redwood.

But it was the inner voyage that drove the Captain until his death in Fueled by psychedelics, he set sail and rode the great wave as a neuronaut, with only the white noise in his ears and a fever in his brain.

His head shorn to a crew and wearing a paramilitary uniform with a holstered long-barrel Colt. His Rolls Royce had broken down on the freeway, so he went to a pay phone and called the company in London. But as a young man, the shoeless hillbilly was purportedly visited by a pair of angels, who told him to build something. He had absolutely no training, "but he had these visions, and he learned to trust them early on," says Willis Harman, director of the Institute of Noetic Sciences in Sausalito, CA.

Harman employed Hubbard as a security guard for SRI, "although," Harman admits, "Al never did anything resembling security work. Harman and Hubbard shared a goal "to provide the [LSD] experience to political and intellectual leaders around the world. Abram Hoffer, "Al had a grandiose idea that if he could give the psychedelic experience to the major executives of the Fortune companies, he would change the whole of society.

I became much concerned that he might shoot me Recognizing its potential psychic hazards, Hubbard believed that LSD should be administered and monitored by trained professionals. He claimed that he had stockpiled more LSD than anyone on the planet besides Sandoz--including the US government--and he clearly wanted a firm hand in influencing the way it was used. Whereas Leary would naturally gravitate toward any microphone available, Hubbard preferred the role of the silent curandero, providing the means for the experience, and letting voyagers decipher its meaning for themselves.

Goddard ordered agents to seize all remaining psychedelics not accounted for by Sandoz. But the doctor refused, and it is believed that Hubbard buried most of his LSD in a sacred parcel in Death Valley, California, claiming that it had been used, rather than risk prosecution.

When the panic subsided, only five government-approved scientists were allowed to continue LSD research--none using humans, and none of them associated with Al Hubbard. In , his finances in ruins, Hubbard was forced to sell his private island sanctuary for what one close friend termed "a pittance. Lack of both finances and government permit to resume research crippled all remaining projects he may have had in the hopper.

During Prohibition, he used his skill with electronics to set up a ship-to-shore communications system in the back of the taxi he drove to help smuggle alcohol into the U. He was caught and served an 18 month prison sentence. However, his skills had not gone unnoticed.

To avoid federal prosecution he moved to Vancouver and became a Canadian citizen. There he founded a charter boat company and became a millionaire in the s. He later received a full presidential pardon from President Harry Truman.

In , Hubbard experienced another angellic visitation telling him that something important to the future of mankind would soon be coming. When he read about LSD the next year, he knew that was it and immediately sought and acquired LSD, which he tried for himself in Following his own experience, he started to turn others on.

He became well known for his procedure of initially introducing people to carbogen, to see how they reacted to a short-term alteration in consciousness, before he scheduled their LSD sessions. At various times over the next 20 years, Hubbard reportedly worked for the Canadian Special Services, the U. How his government positions interacted with his work with LSD is still not known.

During those years he introduced more than 6, people to LSD--including scientists, politicians, intelligence officials, diplomats, and church figures--and became known as the first "Captain Trips", travelling about with a leather case containing pharmaceutically pure LSD, mescaline, and psilocybin. The secret project would see at least two deaths: Osmond doubts that Hubbard would have been associated with such a project "not particularly on humanitarian grounds, but on the grounds that it was bad technique.

Since Harry always argued that psychology would eventually prove what religion already knew, why bother with psychology at all? The movement believed psychology could help people toward religion, and religion could help them psychologically. A physician participating in a seminar wrote that he had learned that psychiatry taught, "To be happy you must be properly oriented to your environment and totally integrated, so that every action is a productive one leading to full potentiality.

Freudian psychology, which defined religious belief as neurotic, was an example of the first danger. Harry believed that "Freudian psychology leads to a mechanistic view of the universe and to a philosophy of meaninglessness.

She had gone on to earn a Ph. When she told the participants, "nothing that has been said is a surprise, at least to me," she was repeating language she had used to describe her Buchmanite experience. Emilia assured the group that they became more lovable when they opened up and admitted their "inmost natures and problems," and explained that it was all part of the process of discovering what they could be so that they could see where they were and how they could move toward what God intended them to be.

In Emilia and Betty Eisner were coleaders of a group that wrote spontaneously on themes suggested by Emilia, "trying to express their own feelings rather than intellectual concepts.

We are learning how such activities can contribute to the process of individual change with which we are concerned. The most explicit was a seminar entitled "Group Therapy" led by Betty Eisner. It was described as "an intensive group therapy situation and will be conducted on a very personal level aimed at removing barriers within the individual which obstruct his growth in creative living.

The use of art materials will play an important role. The announcement letter for the seminar season cautioned potential participants that the leaders were "neither qualified nor intended to perform the function of psychotherapy," and they would not accept anybody who seemed more interested in that than in pursuing a religious life.

Although nobody knew it at the time, Sequoia Seminar was one of a stream of sources for what would become the "human potential" movement of the s. Their stress of religious values kept them from total involvement, but for several years in the late s they were the place where some of the California activists in the human potential movement got their start. One was Del Carlson. Carlson was a Marine Corps veteran who had been attracted to a Records study group at San Jose State College in and who had participated actively in Students Concerned.

He stayed with the movement after the demise of Students Concerned and was, for a dozen years, one of the mainstays of the group. A high school art teacher, he had his summers free and devoted them to Sequoia Seminar. Carlson was also a friend of Michael Murphy, the man who founded Esalen. Even more important, both to Sequoia Seminar and the human potential movement, was Willis Harman.

An engineering professor at Stanford, Harman had attended a study group led by Harry [Rathbun] and then had gone to a Sequoia Seminar in He embarked on an extended period of self-education in mysticism and psychic phenomena and moved into the inner circle of Sequoia Seminar.

On November 16, , eight of the Sequoia Seminar leadership group accompanied Harman to the home of a physician member of the movement, where Harman took LSD for the first time [Interesting Harman in another interview says ].

In subsequent years almost every member of the Sequoia Seminar inner leadership group experimented with LSD on a number of occasions. Many of the drug sessions were led by Betty Eisner who was very interested in the psychotherapeutic possibilities of low doses of the then legal hallucinogen. She and Harman disagreed strongly, however, on how the drug should be used since he [Harman] preferred larger doses that would provide the user with mystical experiences, rather than the milder effects that Eisner sought.

It was never distributed to anyone other than group leaders, and their sessions were carefully planned and supervised, usually with the presence of one of the planning group members who was a medical doctor. There appear to have been few if any "bad trips," and the drug-induced mystical experiences and psychotherapeutic sessions are usually remembered positively by those who partook of them. Experimentation with LSD stopped after because most of those involved felt there was nothing more to be gained from continued use and perhaps also because of a difficult confrontation between Emilia Rathbun and Betty Eisner that may have involved the use of the drug.

Those, like Harman, who wished to pursue further interests in the drug left Sequoia Seminar and became active in other groups such as Esalen and the International Foundation for Internal Freedom. Sharman by the end of the decade is illustrated by the controversy that surrounded the last meeting of the trustees of the Sharman will in Harry was not only one of the trustees of the self-liquidating foundation set up by the will; he was also its executor.

To convince the others that his group met the intention of the will, Harry invited them out to California for a seminar. Word of the psychological emphasis had spread, and those who toed the orthodox Sharman line were not pleased with what they had heard.

Another summed up his objections by telling Harry that he believed Sequoia Seminar was "quite different from those led by Dr. Very little serious study of the Records themselves seems to be attempted and much time is devoted to the personal problems of the individual members. Training and skill in psychology and psychiatry seem to be very important.

This domination could have made the group an ongoing force within the new human potential movement in California. That course was not followed, however, because in the period between and Emilia underwent a number of severe personal strains that eventually climaxed in a religious revelation. This revelation was the basis for a reclarification of the whole meaning and purpose of the movement.

The psychologizing that Emilia had first questioned back in the early s when it was led by Elizabeth Boyden had slowly worked its way into her own group, and by the end of the decade it threatened to eclipse the religious work completely.

The philosophy that had evolved was based in part on the validity of psychology as a means for personal insight, but it also used the evolutionary and mystical theories of Gerald Heard, and always the objective study of the life of Jesus in the Sharman tradition. Psychology would be exchanged for a new interpretation of the religious message that would finally move Sequoia Seminar from proto-sect to a fully self-conscious religious movement.

The increasing stress on psychology toward the end of the s, and the growing formalization of ideology, were both indications that the group was moving away from the churches both literally and theoretically and toward the sect end of the church-sect continuum. The focus on psychology was perceived by members as a "service," exactly the kind of service predicted by the economic model as compensation for the increased cost of sect membership.


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